2017 National Battery Day

Recognize the every day conveniences that batteries make possible for us by taking on the responsibility to keep them out of our landfills.  Batteries afford us many every day conveniences and are essential in powering our daily lives.  When your batteries run out, recycle them at one of the many convenient Call2Recycle® drop-off locations near you.

How can you take part in leading the charge?

Consumers are invited to take advantage of our many drop off locations which you can find on our web locator for all of your battery recycling needs.

You can also visit any of our national retail partners shown below.

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Great Moments in Battery History

1798 – The Italian physicist, Count Alessandro Volta, built the “voltaic pile”.  This battery consisted of a stack of paired copper zinc disks, separated by cardboard disks, dampened with an acid or salt solution.

1802 – The English chemist, William Cruickshank, designed the first battery made for mass production.  His design joined zinc and copper plates within a wooden box filled with an electrolyte solution.

1859 – The French physician, Gaston Planté, invented the first rechargeable battery.  This was similar to the SSLA (small sealed lead acid) batteries we still use today.

1833 – English scientist, Michael Faraday, established his work on electromagnetism and was the foundation for what is now known as Faraday’s law.  Put simply, it predicts how a magnetic field interacts with an electric circuit, which will produce electromotive force.  This is called “electromagnetic induction”.

1886 – The Niagara Falls Power Company funded Nikola Tesla to find a way to transmit electricity over a long distance.  This became what is known as AC power and was later used in 1893 to light up the Chicago World Fair.


megaphone-icon-green-300x300PROMOTE NATIONAL BATTERY DAY

We thank all of our collection sites & partners that are helping us spread the word about the National Battery Day campaign. To help promote this campaign, click here.