About Call2Recycle

What is Call2Recycle?

Call2Recycle Canada, Inc., is a national not-for-profit battery collection and recycling organization, that operates a national program called Call2Recycle®. Call2Recycle is Canada’s first and largest program of its kind and is the provincially-approved consumer battery collection and recycling program for British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Quebec and Prince Edward Island. In Ontario, Call2Recycle operates as a registered Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) according to the Ontario Batteries Regulation. Call2Recycle operates a voluntary consumer battery collection and recycling program in all other provinces.

Call2Recycle is committed to protecting and preserving the environment by keeping consumer batteries out of landfill and since launching in Canada in 1997, has safely and responsibly collected and recycled 22 million kilograms of batteries.

Call2Recycle accepts household batteries (weighing up to 5 kg) for recycling through its network of more than 9,000 collection locations across Canada including retail and business organizations, government, and municipal depots. Call2Recycle meets and exceeds the most rigorous recycling standards for safe battery recycling and management.

How is Call2Recycle funded? / Who pays for the Call2Recycle program?

In provinces where Call2Recycle operates under approved Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) plans, or as a producer responsibility organization (PRO), Environmental Handling Fees (EHF) are used to fund the program. Battery manufacturers, importers, distributors, and retailers who are obligated by provincial recycling regulations, fund the Call2Recycle program by paying EHFs to ensure the batteries they produce and sell are responsibly recycled when they reach their end of life. 

What is an EHF?

An Environmental Handling Fee, or EHF, is a charge on a product to handle the responsible collection and end-of-life management of that product. Fees are determined using a calculation factoring in the cost to manage the safe and responsible collection and recycling of each battery by specific type. EHFs may vary between provinces.

How does the Call2ecycle program work?

Consumers gather and drop their used batteries off at a Call2Recycle drop-off location near them. Call2Recycle arranges transport of the batteries to sorting partners who organize them by chemistry. Processing partners then extract the reusable battery components for use as input in the manufacturing of new products.

You can read more about the Call2Recycle program here. 

Does Call2Recycle collect all types of batteries?

Call2Recycle collects and recycles both single-use and rechargeable household batteries (weighing up to 5 kg each) in all Canadian provinces.  Call2Recycle also collects and recycles used batteries from electric bicycles, or eBikes, and from electric scooters, or eScooters. For more information about eBike and eScooter recycling, click here.  To find the nearest participating collection site, visit our online locator tool.

What else does Call2Recycle collect?

Call2Recycle currently accepts and recycles single-use and rechargeable household batteries  (weighing up to 5 kg each) as well as batteries from eBikes and eScooters. Visit the What Can I Recycle page for specific details. The Canadian Battery Association’s RecycleMyBattery website provides information about where you can recycle the batteries we don’t currently accept.

Battery Types Collected

What are the different battery types? How do I know what batteries I have?

You can learn about the various battery types here. Call2Recycle accepts household batteries weighing up to 5 kg.

What are single-use batteries?

Single-use batteries (also sometimes called “primary batteries”) are batteries that, once they lose their charge, cannot be used again. They are typically alkaline, lithium primary or carbon-zinc batteries. It is important to recycle single-use batteries, not only to save valuable space in the solid waste stream but also to reuse our natural resources. Learn more about battery types here.

What are rechargeable batteries?

Rechargeable batteries are batteries you can use again after their charge runs out. They are designed for long-term use. You either plug them into a charger or they charge while in the device. Some rechargeable batteries can contain hazardous waste materials, such as heavy metals like lead, cadmium and nickel. Rechargeable batteries should always be recycled. Learn more about battery types here.

Does Call2Recycle collect single-use batteries?

Yes, Call2Recycle collects both single-use and rechargeable batteries.

Does Call2Recycle collect rechargeable batteries?

Yes, Call2Recycle collects both single-use and rechargeable batteries.

What are the most common uses for single-use and rechargeable batteries?

Single-use batteries are typically found in toys, flashlights, remote controls, smoke alarms, headsets, and some handheld gaming systems. Many common household electronics use rechargeable batteries, including cordless power tools, digital cameras, two-way radios, and cordless phones to name just a few. 

What is a dry-cell battery?

A dry cell battery is a type of electric battery commonly used for portable electrical devices. A dry cell uses a paste electrolyte, with only enough moisture to allow current to flow. Unlike a wet cell, a dry cell can operate in any orientation without spilling, as it contains no free liquid, making it suitable for portable equipment.

What is a wet-cell battery?

A wet-cell battery is the original type of rechargeable battery. It is commonly found in aviation, electric utilities, energy storage and cellphone towers. The battery contains a liquid electrolyte such as sulfuric acid, a dangerous corrosive liquid that damages what it comes into contact with.

Do you collect wet-cell batteries?

Call2Recyle only accepts dry-cell batteries weighing up to 5 kg each. We do not accept wet-cell batteries for recycling. Visit the Canadian Battery Association’s RecycleMyBattery website to find out where you can recycle these batteries.

Do you collect car batteries?

Call2Recycle does not accept car batteries for recycling. You can contact your local auto repair/parts store or community solid waste program/transfer stations for recycling information regarding car batteries. The Canadian Battery Association’s RecycleMyBattery website can also help you find a nearby site that accepts car batteries for recycling.

Starting January 1, 2021, Call2Recycle will also recycle the rechargeable lithium batteries (weighing up to 5 kg) used to power eBikes and eScooters. 

Do you collect cellphones?

In the regulated provinces of British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Prince Edward Island, cell phones and their chargers and accessories can be recycled or refurbished through the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association program called RecycleMyCell. In other provinces, Call2Recycle accepts all types of cell phones on a voluntary basis.

Do you accept batteries from electric bicycles and electric scooters?

Starting January 1, 2021, Call2Recycle will also recycle the rechargeable lithium batteries weighing up to 5 kg that are used to power eBikes and eScooters. Please note, however, that collection of eBike and eScooter batteries will be done only through retail outlets in the Call2Recycle collection network that sell eBikes and eScooters.  For more information about Call2Recycle’s eBike and eScooter collection and recycling program, click here.

Are all batteries recyclable?

Call2Recycle accepts all household batteries weighing up to 5 kg each for recycling along with batteries from eBikes and eScooters.

Why Recycle your Batteries

Why should I recycle my batteries?

We use battery-powered products in almost every aspect of our daily lives—for toys and games to television remotes and smoke detectors. Each year billions of batteries end up in landfills, where the toxic metals they contain can enter the waste stream and harm the environment. Call2Recycle diverts these potentially harmful materials from the solid waste stream and safely recycles them for use in new products. By dropping off your batteries for recycling you are helping to:

  • Keep potentially harmful materials out of our landfill and waste stream.
  • Keep people and property safe.  If batteries are improperly disposed of at their end-of-life, they can short circuit or overheat and cause a fire. 
  • Reduce the dependency of mining for virgin materials by capturing metals that can be reused as input for manufacturing new products such as bicycles, pots and pans or even new batteries.

Is it illegal to throw batteries into the trash?

Recycling is the safest and most responsible thing to do with your used batteries to protect your home, community and the environment from fire safety risks and hazardous materials. Provinces including British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Prince Edward Island have enacted legislation requiring batteries be responsibly recycled at their end of life.  In these provinces, batteries are considered hazardous waste material and must not be thrown in the garbage or regular recycling bin. 

How to Recycle your Batteries

How do I recycle with Call2Recycle?

The program is simple. Gather your used batteries (weighing up to 5 kg each). Find a Call2Recycle collection site near you by visiting the online locator tool. Bring your batteries to the location and drop them in the used battery collection box. It is free and it’s that easy! 

Once full, the collection box is transported to sorting partners where the batteries are sorted by chemistry, and then sent to recycling processors, where they are broken into their component parts for reuse in new products. 

What safety precautions should I take when recycling my batteries?

Even when they appear dead, batteries can contain a residual charge which may cause the battery to spark if it comes into contact with another metal object such as another battery, keys, or scissors.  This is why it’s important not to toss old batteries into a junk drawer or box without properly protecting them.  In particular, Lithium Ion (Li-Ion), Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA) rechargeable batteries and lithium primary batteries must be individually bagged or have their terminals covered using electrical tape, duct tape or packing tape, before they are dropped into Call2Recycle boxes to avoid sparking. Alternatively, these batteries can be safely protected by placing each in a clear, sealable plastic bag.  

Other battery types do not need to be individually bagged or taped. If you are not sure of your battery chemistry, click here to learn more about what should be individually bagged or taped, or simply bag the battery to be on the safe side.

Call2Recyle will recycle the batteries and the recyclable bags used to safely protect the batteries.

Where can I drop off my batteries for recycling?

Call2Recycle’s online drop-off locator can help you quickly find the nearest location to you in Canada. These locations include major retailers, municipal depots, community centres, and public agencies. Call2Recycle also collects batteries from private collection sites at hospitals, military bases, businesses and government agencies. 

How much does it cost to recycle my batteries with Call2Recycle?

There is no extra charge to recycle your batteries through the Call2Recycle collection program.

What happens to the batteries after I drop them at a Call2Recycle collection box?

All of our collected batteries are sent to sorters and then, based on their chemical composition, they are processed for recycling. The batteries are broken down into their component parts where their reusable materials are then sold on the open market to be used as input for the manufacturing of new products including batteries, cement additives, and goods made from stainless steel including bicycles and golf clubs. 

What materials are extracted and reused from the batteries I recycle?

Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries: The cadmium is used to make new Ni-Cd batteries or as a stiffener in materials such as cement.

Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) batteries: The cobalt is used to create new lithium-based batteries.

Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/Pb) batteries: The lead is used to make new batteries.

Ni-Cd, Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) and Nickel Zinc (Ni-Zn) batteries: The nickel is used in stainless steel products.

Is the Call2Recycle program offered in other countries?

The Call2Recycle program is also offered in the U.S.

Where can I leave comments?

To leave comments, simply fill out our feedback form. We appreciate hearing from you to help us improve our program.

INDUSTRY FAQs

What is Call2Recycle?

Call2Recycle is Canada’s first and largest consumer battery collection and recycling program operating as the provincially-approved household battery collection and recycling program for British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Quebec and Prince Edward Island.  In Ontario, Call2Recycle operates as a registered Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) according to the Ontario Batteries Regulation. Call2Recycle operates a voluntary consumer battery collection and recycling program in all other provinces.

Call2Recycle is committed to protecting and preserving the environment by keeping consumer batteries out of landfill. Since launching in Canada in 1997, Call2Recycle has safely and responsibly collected and recycled 22 million kilograms of batteries.

Call2Recycle accepts household batteries (weighing up to 5 kg) for recycling through its network of more than 9,000 collection locations across Canada including retail and business organizations, government and municipal depots. Call2Recycle meets and exceeds the most rigorous recycling standards in the world for safe battery recycling and management.  

Who operates the Call2Recycle program?

Call2Recycle Canada, Inc., is a national not-for-profit battery collection and recycling organization, that operates its national program called Call2Recycle®.  The not-for-profit organization, reporting to its Canadian Board of Directors, fulfills the product stewardship obligations of its members, including identified obligated producers of primary and rechargeable batteries in the regulated provinces.

In each of the regulated provinces, Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. satisfies provincial recycling regulations for end-of-life battery management, including maintaining exceptional accessibility rates, supporting local collection events (as applicable) and increasing the volume of used consumer batteries diverted from landfill.

What is product stewardship?

Call2Recycle is an industry-funded product stewardship program. Product stewardship is term used to describe a policy of minimizing the environmental impact of products in the marketplace by placing some responsibility for the end of life management of the product with the original producer. Under a product stewardship policy, the producer organization must consider the whole lifecycle of a product, from development through manufacture and disposal, to ensure that no harm comes to the environment.

What is Individual Producer Responsibility (IPR)?

Individual Producer Responsibility (IPR) is a regulatory model that places full end-of-life product responsibility on the producers, importers and brand owners of a product so that product waste is recovered and reused to produce a new product or packaging material. Ontario enacted an IPR regulatory model in 2020. 

What is a Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO)?

Call2Recycle is a producer responsibility organization, or PRO. A PRO is an organization that assumes the responsibilities of an obligated party as outlined in government regulations regarding the collection and recycling of products. As a PRO, Call2Recycle collects and recycles batteries on behalf of the obligated producers and reports to the regulator on their behalf.

What does it mean to be a program member?

A Call2Recycle program member is an obligated producer, brand holder, first importer or retailer of regulated single-use and rechargeable batteries who pays an environmental handling fee (EHF) to Call2Recycle for the safe and responsible collection and recycling of their batteries.

Call2Recycle is the only Responsible Recycling, R2-certified battery collection and recycling program in Canada, adhering to the highest recognized standards for battery collection, transportation and recycling safety. The program is easy for members to manage, offering a streamlined process for compliant reporting.

Call2Recycle program members benefit from our unparalleled market breadth and depth, which enables us to achieve economies of scale for members, efficiencies to contain costs, and a provincially harmonized program across all regulated provinces. 

How does my organization become a program member?

For more information on how to become a Call2Recycle program member, please contact our member services team at:: 1-888-224-9764 or at erepper@call2recycle.ca

What is an industry steward (program licensee)?

Industry stewards are producers, importers and brand owners of batteries and products that contain batteries who provide financial support to Call2Recycle for the rights to imprint the Call2Recycle Battery Recycling Seal on their rechargeable batteries, products or packaging. The seal tells customers that your organization has paid for the proper end-of-life disposal of batteries you introduce to the marketplace even in the provinces where battery recycling is not regulated. 

How does my organization become a licensee?

For more information on how to become an industry steward or program licensee, please contact our member services team at:: 1-888-224-9764 or at erepper@call2recycle.ca

eBike and eScooter Batteries

Do you collect batteries used in eBikes/eScooters?

Starting January 1, 2021, Call2Recycle will operate a national collection and recycling program for rechargeable lithium batteries (for class 1, 2, or 3 vehicles with max speed of 32km/hr) that are used to power eBikes and eScooters. These batteries will be collected through collection locations that sell the bikes and scooters.

If you manufacture, distribute, sell, ride share or rent battery-powered eBikes and/or eScooters, per provincial regulations, you may be obligated to participate in a stewardship program in British Columbia (B.C.), Saskatchewan (Sak.), Manitoba (Man.), Ontario (Ont.), Prince Edward Island (P.E.I.), Quebec (Que.). To find out more about eBike and eScooter battery recycling, click here to read our program guide.

How do I know if my organization is obligated to recycle eBike and eScooter batteries and what batteries are included?

You can find detailed information about the eBike and eScooter end of life battery regulations on our eMobility page as well as in our Canadian eBike + eScooter Battery Recycling Guide.

Are Environmental Handling Fees applied to eBike and eScooter batteries?

Environmental Handling Fees or EHFs are applied to the cost of eBike and eScooter batteries to cover costs for the safe collection, transportation and recycling of the batteries at their end of life. For more information about eBike and eScooter battery recycling, read our Canadian eBike + eScooter Battery Recycling Guide.

How does the eBike and eScooter battery recycling program work?

Call2Recycle will supply United Nations-approved, pre-addressed, flame-retardant battery shipping boxes to bicycle retailers who are registered as collection sites with Call2Recycle. When the consumer returns an end-of-life or defective battery, it is inspected then placed in the flame-retardant shipping box and sent by approved carrier to a pre-approved processor. Additional boxes may be ordered from Call2Recycle at any time by calling 1-888-665-0908. 

For eBike or eScooter ride sharing operators, when the batteries are damaged in the field and/or reach end-of-life, the operator calls Call2Recycle at 1-888-665-0908 to discuss the quantity, location, and situation. The proper sized container will be sent to the location for loading by operator’s employees based upon clear standard operating procedures (SOPs) pre-approved by both organizations. Call2Recycle will arrange for pick-up and recycling.

Collection Sites and Box or Bulk Shipments

What is a collection site?

Call2Recycle collects household batteries through a wide network of retailers, municipal recycling depots, businesses, and other public agencies. These organizations participate to keep potentially toxic waste from the solid waste stream and make sure the materials in batteries are properly recycled. Our collection sites include locations that are open to the public as well as private collection sites (where, for example, only staff of the site have access to the collection box.) There are more than 9,000 collection sites across Canada. To find a public collection site near you, visit our online locator.

Our organization would like to become a collection site. Do we have to collect from the public?

Call2Recycle partners with public collection sites (where anyone can drop off their used batteries) as well as private collection sites (where, for example, only staff of the site have access to the collection box.) You do not need to collect from the public to become a Call2Recycle collection site. You can click here or contact our Customer Service Team or call 888.224.9764 for details.

How can my organization participate as a collection site?

We will need more information from you to determine the best program fit for your organization. Visit our collection site web page here for more details. You can also request information from the Customer Service Team or by calling 1-888.224.9764.

How do we add more collection sites to our account?

Adding new collection sites is easy. Simply contact our Customer Service Team at 1-888.224.9764. Collection boxes can be shipped directly to the new locations or to a central location for distribution. Boxes come with safe collection and shipping guidelines and pre-paid shipping slips.

How does our collection site order more collection boxes and/or bags?

Two new collection boxes, nested one inside the other, are automatically shipped to you after we receive your full box at our sorting facility. If you are getting low on collection boxes or bags, you can also submit the collection box re-order form for additional supplies. It takes approximately 2-5 business days for you to receive new boxes.

Does every battery need to be bagged?

Consumers should place their batteries into the bags provided at the Call2Recycle box or bring them in their own clear, sealable plastic bag. Some batteries—Lithium Ion (Li-Ion), Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA) rechargeable batteries and lithium primary batteries—must be individually bagged or have their terminals covered with tape before they are shipped. If you are not sure of your battery’s chemistry, you can check here or, please bag the battery individually to be on the safe side.

Call2Recycle will safely recycle the batteries and the recyclable bags used to safely protect the batteries.

How do I schedule a pick-up of my collection box?

All Call2Recycle boxes come with a pre-paid return shipping label already attached. When you’re ready to schedule a pickup, you can call Purolator directly at 1.888.744.7123 to schedule your box pick-up at no cost to you. Once your box is received at the sorter, our auto replenishment system will automatically send you two new boxes.  If you need to order additional collection boxes, you can click here for a direct link to the online order form.  

My collection box is missing a shipping label. What do I do?

Contact our Customer Service Team at 1-888.224.9764 to order a new shipping label. It will be sent to you at no charge.

What if I have collected a large quantity of batteries to ship?

Call2Recycle offers a bulk collection program for collection sites that have shipments of 227 kg or more. For more information about shipping in bulk in Canada, click here.

Our location uses a large quantity of batteries. Can we send bulk shipments?

Call2Recycle offers a bulk collection program for collection sites that have shipments of 227 kg or more. For more information about shipping in bulk in Canada, click here.

Are collection boxes available in other sizes?

Call2Recycle offers the standard 30 kg size collection box at this time for household battery collections. If you need to order more boxes or you need to take part in our bulk collection program, click contact us or visit the website and complete this questionnaire. Call2Recycle will contact you to set up the shipment.

If you have larger batteries from eBikes or eScooters that you would like to send for recycling, you can order new eBike and eScooter battery collection boxes at any time by calling customer service at 1-888-224-9764 or on-line at www.call2recycle.ca/emobility-kit-order/.  Each box holds up to 25 lbs / 12 kgs of batteries, equal to roughly three or four battery units. For more information about eBike and eScooter battery collections, click here.

Environmental Handling Fees

Where are environmental handling fees being applied?

EHFs are only applied in provinces where Call2Recycle operates under government-approved stewardship plans and in Ontario where the program operates as an Individual Producer Responsibility organization.  

Who pays for the environmental handling fees (EHFs)?

The EHFs are remitted by the obligated party, which can be a retailer, wholesaler, distributor or manufacturer.  It is at the discretion of the obligated party to determine whether to pass along the EHFs to consumers. The fee may be visible or hidden depending on the jurisdiction.

Battery Recycling

What are single-use batteries?

Single-use batteries are typically alkaline, lithium primary or carbon-zinc batteries. Once they lose their charge, they can’t be used again. It is important to recycle single-use batteries, not only to save valuable space in the solid waste stream but also to reuse our natural resources. Some provinces require the recycling of all batteries, including single-use.

What are rechargeable batteries?

Rechargeable batteries are batteries you use more than once; they are designed for long-term use. You either plug them into a charger or they charge while in the device. Some rechargeable batteries can contain potentially harmful materials, such as heavy metals like lead, cadmium and nickel. Rechargeable batteries should always be recycled and in some states or provinces, recycling is the law.

Do you collect single-use batteries?

Yes both single-use and rechargeable batteries are collected in Canada.

What are the most common uses for and single-use and rechargeable batteries?

You typically find single-use batteries in toys, flashlights, remote controls, smoke alarms and some handheld gaming systems. You’ll find that many common household cordless electronics use rechargeable batteries, including cellphones, cordless power tools, laptop computers, digital cameras, two-way radios, MP3 players/iPods, tablets and cordless phones to name just a few. Check the battery’s label to identify its type.

What batteries can I recycle?

We accept all rechargeable batteries weighing up to 5 kg each, including Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH), Lithium Ion (Li-Ion), Nickel Zinc (Ni-Zn) and Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/Pb). We also accept alkaline, lithium primary and carbon-zinc batteries.

 

What batteries need to be individually bagged?

Lithium Ion (Li-Ion), Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/Pb) rechargeable batteries and lithium primary batteries must be individually bagged or have their terminals covered with tape before they are shipped. Other battery types do not need to be individually bagged. If you are not sure what chemistry your battery is, then please bag it to be on the safe side.

What is recycled from the batteries I turn in?

  • Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries: The cadmium is used to make new Ni-Cd batteries or as a stiffener in materials such as cement.
  • Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) batteries: The cobalt is used to create new lithium-based batteries.
  • Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/Pb) batteries: The lead is used to make new batteries.
  • Ni-Cd, Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) and Nickel Zinc (Ni-Zn) batteries: The nickel is used in stainless steel products.

Why is it so important to recycle batteries? Don’t they last forever?

Single-use batteries lose their charge and cannot be recharged. Rechargeable batteries lose their ability to hold a charge after 1,000 charges or 2-5 years, depending on how often they are used and if they are handled and charged properly. At that point, they cannot be used. We encourage you to recycle both kinds instead of throwing them in the trash.

Is it illegal to throw away batteries in the trash?

Some provinces have made it illegal to dispose of batteries in the regular trash. They are considered potentially toxic material. Regardless of the law, it’s smart to recycle them and keep them from entering the solid waste stream and potentially harming the environment.

What is a wet-cell battery?

A wet-cell battery is the original type of rechargeable battery. It is commonly found in aviation, electric utilities, energy storage and cellphone towers. The battery contains a liquid electrolyte such as sulfuric acid, a dangerous corrosive liquid that damages what it comes into contact with.

Do you collect wet-cell batteries?

Call2Recyle currently accepts only dry-cell batteries weighing up to 5 kg each. We do not accept wet-cell batteries for recycling. Visit the Canadian Battery Association’s RecycleMyBattery website to find out where you can recycle these batteries. 

 

Do you collect car batteries?

We do not accept car batteries for recycling. You can contact your local auto repair/parts store or community solid waste program/transfer stations for recycling information. The Canadian Battery Association’s RecycleMyBattery website can also help you find a nearby site that accepts car batteries for recycling.

Battery Recycling Safety

Do I have to do anything to my batteries before recycling them?

It depends on the battery. Transportation Canada safety regulations require that the terminals of certain battery types be protected to prevent contact with each other, as this can cause sparks and lead to a fire. Therefore, before depositing any rechargeable batteries, lithium-based single-use batteries, single-use batteries that are 12V or more, or batteries you are unsure of, make sure they are placed in a clear, sealed bag or taped with duct tape, electrical tape or another non-conductive tape. Ensure to keep the battery chemistry visible if you tape it.

If I miss protecting some of the batteries, what are the potential consequences?

Our #1 safety goal is to prevent battery terminals from touching and possibly sparking before they are shipped or while they are in transit. Organizations that don’t properly protect their batteries may face fines from Transportation Canada and may not be able to participate in the Call2Recycle program.

Why can’t I return a box via air?

Transportation Canada places very stringent restrictions on the shipment of certain batteries by air due to safety considerations. Our program prohibits air shipments. If you are located in a remote location, you can transport the batteries by truck, rail or boat to the nearest municipality served by Purolator. Once there, the batteries can be shipped to Call2Recycle using the waybill provided. Please call Customer Service if you have questions about coordinating these shipments.

Can I use paper, other boxes, towels or other materials to protect the terminals?

Because paper-based products are flammable and can act as kindling, they are not an approved method of protection. If you are depositing any rechargeable batteries, lithium-based single-use batteries, single-use batteries that are 12V or more, or batteries you are unsure of, make sure they are placed in a clear, sealed bag or taped with duct tape, electrical tape or another non-conductive tape. Ensure to keep the battery chemistry visible if you tape it. Do not use paper or other materials to protect your terminals.

Does every battery need a bag?

No. Transportation Canada safety regulations require that the terminals of certain battery types be protected to prevent contact with each other, as this can cause sparks and lead to a fire. Here is the proper way to protect your batteries to ensure they are recycled safely:

For single-use lithium-based batteries, single-use batteries that are 12V or more, rechargeable batteries, or batteries whose chemistry/voltage you are unsure of: Place the battery in one of the clear bags provided with the Call2Recycle box or tape the terminal end with duct tape, electrical tape or another non-conductive tape for safety (keeping the chemistry visible) before depositing.

All other batteries: Deposit the battery directly in the Call2Recycle box.

If you run out of Call2Recycle bags, you can use a clear, Ziploc-style or clear grocery produce bag. Be sure to close off the top before depositing in the Call2Recycle box. For the complete list of batteries with terminals that must be protected to comply with these requirements, please consult the Call2Recycle Canada web site, www.call2recycle.ca/safety/collections-shipping.

What do we do if we have a defective, damaged (e.g. swollen), or recalled (DDR) battery?

Contact Customer Service at 1.888.224.9764. They will review with you whether the battery requires special handling. DDR batteries must be shipped in packaging that complies with Transportation Canada requirements for the transportation of damaged, defective or recalled batteries.

Damaged, Defective and Recalled Batteries

What is a damaged battery?

A battery that is swollen, corroded, leaking or showing burn marks is considered damaged and hazardous to the public. Devices with damaged batteries often show swelling, corrosion or other physical damage in the area where the battery is located.

What is a defective battery?

Defective batteries are those that affect the performance of a device, such as unexpected shutdowns. Defective batteries may not display any visible changes but have been identified by the manufacturer as not performing as expected.

What is a recalled battery?

Recalled batteries are classified by model, serial number, batch or lot. Manufacturers recall batteries that do not perform as expected and may present a safety hazard. Recalled batteries may not display any visible damage.

What do I do with a damaged battery?

Package the battery in a non-flammable material, such as sand or kitty litter, as soon as possible. Do not place these batteries in the trash or in a regular Call2Recycle collection container as they may present a safety hazard, such as a spark or fire. Further instructions can be found above

Are damaged batteries usually a particular chemistry?

Most damaged batteries are lithium metal or lithium ion. For a more comprehensive list of batteries, please consult the Call2Recycle Canada web site, www.call2recycle.ca/safety/collections-shipping.

If you have another battery chemistry that you think is damaged, contact Customer Service at 1.888.224.9764 for assistance.

Why do damaged, defective and recalled batteries require special shipping?

Damaged, defective and recalled batteries are considered potentially hazardous to the public and the environment. If these batteries are shipped without proper packaging and handling, they are more likely to create a safety incident, such as a spark, during transit from the collection site to the processing facility. In addition, Transportation Canada requires hazardous materials be transported using special handling procedures.

Where can I find out if a battery has been recalled?

Visit the battery manufacturer’s web site to see if the battery has been recalled and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for disposal and replacement. Some recalled products are also listed on Health Canada’s Consumer Product Safety page.

Who do we contact if we suspect we have a damaged, defective or recalled battery?

Contact Call2Recycle Customer Service at 1.888.224.9764. They can discuss whether the battery requires special handling according to Transportation Canada requirements.

What type of kits do you offer for damaged, defective and recalled batteries?

Our kits are designed to handle lithium-ion or lithium-metal batteries with (1) a total combined weight of up to 2 kg (4.4 lb.) OR one single-cell battery or other battery weighing up to 5 kg (11 lb.) The kits have been fully tested in a UN/ISTA certification lab and are UN-compliant with CFR49 rules governing safe battery shipments.