Battery Recycling (12)

What are single-use batteries?

Single-use batteries are typically alkaline, lithium primary or carbon-zinc batteries. Once they lose their charge, they can’t be used again. It is important to recycle single-use batteries, not only to save valuable space in the solid waste stream but also to reuse our natural resources. Some provinces require the recycling of all batteries, including single-use.

What are rechargeable batteries?

Rechargeable batteries are batteries you use more than once; they are designed for long-term use. You either plug them into a charger or they charge while in the device. Some rechargeable batteries can contain potentially harmful materials, such as heavy metals like lead, cadmium and nickel. Rechargeable batteries should always be recycled and in some states or provinces, recycling is the law.

Do you collect single-use batteries?

Yes both single-use and rechargeable batteries are collected in Canada.

What are the most common uses for and single-use and rechargeable batteries?

You typically find single-use batteries in toys, flashlights, remote controls, smoke alarms and some handheld gaming systems. You’ll find that many common household cordless electronics use rechargeable batteries, including cellphones, cordless power tools, laptop computers, digital cameras, two-way radios, MP3 players/iPods, tablets and cordless phones to name just a few. Check the battery’s label to identify its type.

What batteries can I recycle?

We accept all rechargeable batteries weighing up to 5 kg each, including Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH), Lithium Ion (Li-Ion), Nickel Zinc (Ni-Zn) and Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/Pb). We also accept alkaline, lithium primary and carbon-zinc batteries.

 

What batteries need to be individually bagged?

Lithium Ion (Li-Ion), Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/Pb) rechargeable batteries and lithium primary batteries must be individually bagged or have their terminals covered with tape before they are shipped. Other battery types do not need to be individually bagged. If you are not sure what chemistry your battery is, then please bag it to be on the safe side.

What is recycled from the batteries I turn in?

  • Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries: The cadmium is used to make new Ni-Cd batteries or as a stiffener in materials such as cement.
  • Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) batteries: The cobalt is used to create new lithium-based batteries.
  • Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/Pb) batteries: The lead is used to make new batteries.
  • Ni-Cd, Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) and Nickel Zinc (Ni-Zn) batteries: The nickel is used in stainless steel products.

Why is it so important to recycle batteries? Don’t they last forever?

Single-use batteries lose their charge and cannot be recharged. Rechargeable batteries lose their ability to hold a charge after 1,000 charges or 2-5 years, depending on how often they are used and if they are handled and charged properly. At that point, they cannot be used. We encourage you to recycle both kinds instead of throwing them in the trash.

Is it illegal to throw away batteries in the trash?

Some provinces have made it illegal to dispose of batteries in the regular trash. They are considered potentially toxic material. Regardless of the law, it’s smart to recycle them and keep them from entering the solid waste stream and potentially harming the environment.

What is a wet-cell battery?

A wet-cell battery is the original type of rechargeable battery. It is commonly found in aviation, electric utilities, energy storage and cellphone towers. The battery contains a liquid electrolyte such as sulfuric acid, a dangerous corrosive liquid that damages what it comes into contact with.

Do you collect wet-cell batteries?

Call2Recyle currently accepts only dry-cell batteries weighing up to 5 kg each. We do not accept wet-cell batteries for recycling. Visit the Canadian Battery Association’s RecycleMyBattery website to find out where you can recycle these batteries. 

 

Do you collect car batteries?

We do not accept car batteries for recycling. You can contact your local auto repair/parts store or community solid waste program/transfer stations for recycling information. The Canadian Battery Association’s RecycleMyBattery website can also help you find a nearby site that accepts car batteries for recycling.

Call2Recycle (6)

Who is Call2Recycle®?

We are the premier, no-cost used battery and cellphone collection program with a network of more than 30,000 collection sites offered throughout North America. Since 1996, environmentally committed people like you have helped us divert more than 35 million kg of rechargeable batteries from the solid waste stream. In 2012 alone, we collected more than 4.5 million kg of batteries–a record-breaking year. We bring together consumers, businesses, non-profit groups, retailers, government agencies and the battery and electronics industries to find ways to minimize the environmental impact of batteries and associated products at the end of their useful lives.

 

How are you funded?

Major product and battery manufacturers across the globe, industry stewards, fund our recycling program to ensure that the batteries and cellphones that they introduce into the marketplace are being responsibly recycled when they reach their end of life. These industry stewards are committed to keeping batteries and cellphones out of the solid waste stream and recycling them to create new products. You can support participating manufacturers by looking for products featuring the Call2Recycle Battery Seal.

How does the Call2Recycle Program work?

You can read more about how our program works here.

What is product stewardship?

We are an industry-funded product stewardship program. Product stewardship is a policy of minimizing the environmental impact of products in the marketplace. Product stewardship advocates that organizations look at the whole lifecycle of a product, from development through manufacture and disposal, and ensures that no harm comes to the environment.

Who operates Call2Recycle?

The Call2Recycle® program is operated by Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. (formerly the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation – RBRC), a not-for-profit organization. RBRC was founded in the mid-1990s by five concerned battery manufacturers as a voluntary, industry-run initiative to keep the heavy metals from rechargeable batteries out of the solid waste stream.

Where can I leave comments?

Simply fill out our feedback form with your comments. We appreciate hearing from you to help us improve our program.

Cellphone Recycling (4)

What kind of cellphones do you recycle?

We accept all cellphones, with or without their batteries.

What happens to the cellphones you collect?

Depending on condition, the cellphones may be refurbished and resold. We recycle phones that can’t be refurbished. The proceeds help fund the cellphone collection program and public education.

Do you accept cellphone rechargers and cellphone accessories for recycling?

Call2Recycle accepts cellphones and their batteries but not the chargers or accessories. However, the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association coordinates a nationwide mobile phone recycling and refurbishment program called RecycleMyCell. Click here to find a drop off location.

Do I need to remove my personal information from my cellphone before I donate it?

We recommend that you remove the personal information on your phone, although it is not required. In the recycling process, the memory on the phones is destroyed and reusable materials are recycled before they are resold. To remove the information from your phone, consult your cellphone user manual, manufacturer’s web site or the instructions found on the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association’s web site.

Collection Sites (5)

What is a collection site?

A wide variety of retailers, businesses, communities and government agencies collect batteries and cellphones as part of the Call2Recycleprogram. Organizations participate to keep potentially toxic waste from the solid waste stream and make sure these materials are properly recycled. We have 30,000 public collection sites in both the U.S. and Canada. We also have internal collection sites, such as hospitals, military bases, businesses and government agencies, which collect batteries internally. These organizations are not listed in our locator.

How do we participate as a collection site?

We will need more information from you to determine the best fit for your organization. Visit our web page for more details. You can also request information from the Customer Service Teamor call 888.224.9764 for more information.

How do we add more collection sites to our account?

Adding new collection sites is easy. Just contact our Customer Service Team at 888.224.9764. Collection kits can be shipped directly to the new locations or to a central location for distribution. These kits include all the materials you need to set up a collection display area.

Our organization is already a collection site. How do we order more collection boxes and/or bags?

You will automatically be shipped a new collection kit after we receive one from you at our recycling facility. If you are getting low on collection boxes or bags, you can also submit the collection kit re-order form for additional supplies. It takes approximately 2-5 business days for you to receive new supplies.

Does every battery need a bag?

Lithium Ion (Li-Ion), Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/Pb) rechargeable batteries and lithium primary batteries must be individually bagged or have their terminals covered with tape before they are shipped. Other battery types do not need to be individually bagged. If you are not sure what chemistry your battery is, then please bag it to be on the safe side.

Covered Products (2)

What types of products are subject to an EHF? Is there a tool to help identify the products that are subject to a EHF?

Yes, please refer to Call2Recycle’s fee schedule and product guide to help you determine which products are subject to an EHF

What kind of products do you collect and recycle?

Call2Recycle is the approved stewardship program in BC, MB, and QC for consumer/household batteries. We collect dry-cell batteries including:

  • Lithium Ion
  • Nickel Cadmium
  • Nickel Metal Hydride
  • Nickel Zinc
  • Alkaline
  • Lithium Primary
  • Silver Oxide
  • Zinc Air
  • Zinc Carbon
  • Zinc Chloride

 

General (10)

What is Call2Recycle®?

Call2Recycle® is the only free household battery collection program in North America. Since 1996, Call2Recycle® has diverted over 45 million kilograms of batteries of used household batteries from local landfills and established a network of 30,000 drop-off locations.

Advancing green business practices and environmental sustainability, Call2Recycle® is the most active voice promoting eco-safe reclamation and recycling of household batteries. Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. is a non-profit organization.

How does the program work?

As our world goes wireless, retailers, corporate offices, communities and public agencies are becoming increasingly aware of the need to recycle batteries that power the items used in day-to-day operations and life. 30,000 businesses and organizations across Canada and the U.S. understand the need to recycle batteries, and have enrolled in our program to serve as collection sites.

Consumers can collect household batteries that are no longer being used, then visit call2recycle.ca or call 1-866-794-7272 to find a nearby public drop-off location that accepts them free of charge. The collection site ships the batteries at no cost to our recycling partners.

Many corporate offices, healthcare facilities and other businesses or public agencies serve as private Call2Recycle collection sites to collect and recycle the batteries used in their daily operations.

How is the program funded?

The Call2Recycle® program is funded by eco-fees collected in the province by the enterprises that have the regulatory obligation to recycle household batteries. In general they are manufacturers, brand owners and users, and retailers.

Why is recycling household batteries important?

Like newspapers, glass and plastic, batteries can and should be recycled. Consumers use an average of six wireless products – which are powered by batteries – in their day-to-day lives.

Batteries can contain metals that may be harmful to the environment if sent to landfills, but when recycled properly, can be reclaimed and used to make new products. The Call2Recycle® program keeps millions of kilograms of batteries from entering the solid waste stream each year, preserving natural resources and helping to fulfill the mission for a more sustainable earth.

How do I know which types of household batteries can be recycled?

Call2Recycle® accepts all dry-cell household batteries up to 5 kg.

Does Call2Recycle® collect single-use batteries?

Yes, Call2Recycle® accepts single-use batteries in all Canadian provinces.

Does Call2Recycle® collect rechargeable batteries?

Yes, Call2Recycle® accepts rechargeablebatteries in all Canadian provinces.

Why do we need to recycle rechargeable batteries?

Most rechargeable batteries can be recharged up to 1,000 charges – between two and five years depending on frequency of use, proper handling and charging – but eventually they will no longer hold a full charge and must be replaced. That is when they can and should be recycled.

What happens to the batteries once they are collected?

Once collected, the batteries are sent to our recycling partners located throughout North America. There they are sorted by chemistry and melted down to make new products. Metals that are reclaimed from batteries during the recycling process include:

  • Zinc – Found in alkaline primary batteries.
  • Cadmium – Found in Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries.
  • Cobalt – Found in Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) batteries.
  • Lead – Found in Small Sealed Lead Acid (SSLA/Pb) batteries.
  • Nickel – Found in Ni-Cd, Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) and Nickel Zinc (Ni-Zn) batteries.

General (10)

Qu’est-ce qu’Appel à RecyclerMD ?

Appel à RecyclerMD est le seul programme gratuit de collecte de piles et de batteries domestiques en Amérique du Nord. Depuis 1996,  Appel à RecyclerMD a détourné plus de 45 millions de kilogrammes de piles domestiques usagées de l’enfouissement et établi un réseau de plus de 30 000 points de dépôts. 

En faisant progresser les pratiques commerciales vertes et la durabilité environnementale, Appel à RecyclerMD est l’organisme qui défend le plus activement la récupération et le recyclage écologiques des piles et des batteries domestiques.  Appel à Recycler Canada, Inc. est une organisation à but non lucratif.

Comment fonctionne le programme ?

Alors que les technologies sans fil sont plus présentes que jamais dans nos vies, les détaillants, les entreprises, les collectivités et les organismes publics prennent de plus en plus conscience de la nécessité de recycler les piles et les batteries qui alimentent ces appareils qui font partie de notre quotidien.
Plus de 30 000 entreprises et organismes du Canada et des États-Unis comprennent l’importance du recyclage des piles et des batteries et se sont inscrits au programme Appel à RecyclerMD afin de devenir des points de dépôt.

Les consommateurs peuvent recueillir les piles et les batteries qui ne sont plus utilisées, puis consulter le site appelarecycler.ca ou composer le 1-866-794-7272 afin de trouver un point de dépôt public qui recueille ces produits gratuitement dans leur région. Le point de dépôt se charge ensuite d’expédier les piles et les batteries sans frais à nos partenaires de recyclage.

De nombreux bureaux, établissements de soins de santé et autres entreprises ou organismes publics agissent comme centres de collecte privés pour Appel à RecyclerMD. Ils contribuent ainsi à recueillir et à recycler les piles et les batteries utilisées dans le cadre de leurs activités courantes.

Comment le programme est-il financé ?

Le programme Appel à RecyclerMDest financé par des écofrais perçus dans la province par les entreprises qui ont l’obligation règlementaire de collecter et de recycler les piles et les batteries domestiques. Il s’agit en général de manufacturiers, de propriétaires et de détenteurs de marques, et de détaillants.

Comment peut-on devenir un point de dépôt ?

Visitez notre site Web pour demander de l’information ou composer le 1-866-794-7272.

Pourquoi est-il important de recycler les piles et les batteries ?

À l’instar des journaux, du verre et du plastique, les piles peuvent et doivent être recyclées. En moyenne, dans leur vie quotidienne, les gens utilisent six appareils sans fil alimentés par des piles.

Les piles et les batteries contiennent parfois des métaux qui peuvent être dangereux pour l’environnement lorsqu’ils sont envoyés dans les sites d’enfouissement. Toutefois, lorsqu’ils sont recyclés adéquatement, ces métaux peuvent être récupérés et utilisés pour fabriquer de nouveaux produits.

Grâce au programme Appel à RecyclerMD, des millions de kilogrammes de piles et de batteries sont détournés des décharges chaque année, ce qui permet de conserver les ressources et d’accroître la durabilité environnementale.

Comment savoir quels types de piles et de batteries domestiques peuvent être recyclés ?

Appel à RecyclerMD accepte toutes les piles et les batteries sèches domestiques dont le poids ne dépasse pas 5 kg.

Est-ce qu’Appel à RecyclerMD collecte les piles et les batteries à usage unique ?

Au Canada, le programme Appel à RecyclerMD recueille les piles et les batteries à usage unique dans toutes les provinces.

Est-ce qu’Appel à RecyclerMD collecte les piles et les batteries rechargeables ?

Au Canada, le programme Appel à RecyclerMD recueille les piles et les batteries rechargeables dans toutes les provinces.

Pourquoi faut-il recycler les piles rechargeables ?

La plupart des piles rechargeables peuvent être rechargées jusqu’à 1 000 fois. Leur durée de vie varie de deux à cinq ans, selon la fréquence d’utilisation, la manipulation et le temps de charge, mais elles deviennent progessivement incapables de fournir une charge complète et doivent être remplacées. C’est pour cette raison qu’elles peuvent et doivent être recyclées.

Qu’est-ce qui est fait avec les piles et les batteries recueillies ?

Les piles et les batteries recueillies sont envoyées à nos partenaires de recyclage basés à différents endroits en Amérique du Nord. Elles sont triées en fonction de leur composition chimique, puis fondues afin de fabriquer de nouveaux produits.  Les matériaux récupérés durant le processus de recyclage des piles comprennent les métaux ci-dessous :

  • Zinc – Présent dans les piles et les batteries alcalines primaires.
  • Cadmium – Présent dans les piles et les batteries au nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd).
  • Cobalt – Présent dans les piles et les batteries au lithium-ion (Li-Ion).
  • Plomb – Présent dans les petites piles scellées au plomb-acide (PPSPA).
  • Nickel – Présent dans les piles et les batteries au Ni-Cd, à hydrure métallique de nickel (Ni-MH) et au nickel-zinc (Ni-Zn).

General (7)

Why is Call2Recycle implementing Environmental Handling Fees (EHFs)?

Call2Recycle’s mission is and continues to be responsibly managing the end-of-life of batteries to keep them out of landfills and minimize environmental impact. Over the past 20 years, we have learned that the best way to achieve this goal and encourage participation is by offering a robust, convenient program where consumers can easily recycle their batteries.

In order for Call2Recycle to continue to run our industry leading program and implement continuous program enhancements, we have made the decision to follow industry best practices and implement an Environmental Handling Fee (EHF). These actions will ensure our collection and recycling program remains sustainable while continuing to meet the highest environmental standards.

There haven’t been EHFs on batteries before, why now?

As part of our commitment to delivering an industry leading stewardship program we continually evaluate how we can do better. We’ve found that not only is this prudent financially to ensure our program can continue to operate at the highest standards, this approach follows industry best practices and is consistent with other stewardship programs across select provinces.

Will these EHFs be rolled out in provinces other than BC, MB, or QC?

EHFs will not be introduced outside of BC, MB, and QC at this time; however, with support from battery and battery-powered product manufacturers Call2Recycle will continue to collect and recycle batteries.

Who pays for the EHFs?

The EHFs are remitted by the obligated party which can be a retailer, wholesaler, distributor or manufacturer.  It is at the discretion of the obligated party to determine whether to pass along the EHFs to consumers. The fee may be visible or hidden depending on the jurisdiction.

Why do EHFs differ in different provinces?

Fees are calculated based on the cost to collect and manage batteries generated within each province. Given the regional differences (such as geography, population, location of collection sites and processors), program costs vary between provinces.

What is an EHF?

An Environmental Handling Fee or EHF is a fee that is representative of the actual cost to collect, handle, transport and responsibly recycle batteries at the end of life. EHFs collected are also used for public education and to further expand program awareness to ensure batteries do not enter the waste stream.

Who is Call2Recycle and what is their role?

Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. works on behalf of stakeholders to provide its battery recycling program, Call2Recycle®, to consumers across Canada.  Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. is the approved battery stewardship organization in British Columbia, Manitoba, and Quebec.

Industry Stewards (4)

What is an industry steward?

Industry stewards are the foundation of the Call2Recycle program. They are the organizations committed to promoting the responsible recycling of electronic products and batteries when they reach their end of life. Their rechargeable batteries and/or battery-powered products display the Call2Recycle Battery Recycling Seal. They provide the financial support for the program.

How do we become an industry steward?

For more information on how to become an industry steward, please contact us.

What are the benefits of being an industry steward?

Industry stewards gain many benefits through their support of the Call2Recycle program. Their support fulfills recycling requirements in the U.S. and Canada, including compliance with extensive state, provincial and federal regulations. Our Benefits of Being an Industry Steward web page outlines the advantages of becoming a Call2Recycle industry steward.

What is a licensee?

A licensee is a type of industry steward that provides financial support to Call2Recycle for the rights to imprint the Call2Recycle Battery Recycling Seal on its rechargeable batteries, products or packaging. The Seal tells customers that your organization has paid for the proper end-of-life disposal of batteries you introduce to the marketplace.

Marketing and Shipping (for Collection Sites) (6)

How do I schedule a pick-up for my collection box?

All Call2Recycle boxes come with a pre-paid return shipping label already attached. If Purolator or Canada Post regularly picks up or drops off packages at your location, you can leave the box for them to pick up on their next visit.  If you need to schedule a pickup, you can directly call Purolator at no charge. If you are outside of the Purolator or Canada Post service area, please contact our Customer Service Team at 888.224.9764 to arrange a pickup.

How do I order promotion and education materials?

Visit the Support Materials page to access program materials, including posters, customizable press releases, web banners and images. Most materials can be customized. Contact our Customer Service Team at 888.224.9764 to order custom options.

My collection box is missing a shipping label. What do I do?

Contact our Customer Service Team at 888.224.9764 to order a new shipping label. It will be sent to you at no charge

 

What if I have collected a large quantity of batteries to ship?

Call2Recycleoffers a bulk for collection sites that have shipments of 227 kg or more. For more information about shipping in bulk in Canada, click here.

We have a bulk shipment ready. How do we schedule a pick-up?

Visit the website and complete this questionnaire. Call2Recycle will contact you to set up the shipment.

Are collection boxes available in other sizes?

We only offer the standard 30 kg size collection box at this time. If you need to order more, simply contact us.

Members EN (7)

APPLICABLE REGULATION

Quebec’s Regulation respecting the recovery and reclamation of products by enterprises obligates enterprises marketing household batteries in Quebec to either operate or be a member of an approved program to recover and reclaim end-of-life household batteries in Quebec.

To access the regulation, please click here.

TYPES OF BATTERIES COVERED

The Regulation indicates that the household battery category is composed of two sub-categories:

1. Rechargeable cells of any shape and batteries composed of such rechargeable cells, except lead-acid batteries, batteries designed to be used in motor vehicles and batteries exclusively designed and intended for industrial purposes;

2. Single use button cells, batteries composed of such cells, other single use batteries and batteries composed of such cells.

BATTERIES AS COMPONENTS

In addition to batteries sold separately, batteries marketed in Quebec as components of other products are also covered by the Regulation.

Pending the revision of the Regulation expected in 2016, Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. asks its members to report only the batteries that are components of construction and renovation tools, and gardening tools.

For the list of gardening, construction and renovation tools, please click here.

ENTERPRISES COVERED BY THE REGULATION

The Regulation indicates that every enterprise that “markets” a new product referred to in the Regulation under a brand, a name or a distinguishing guise owned or used by the enterprise must recover and reclaim, or cause to be recovered and reclaimed, by means of a recovery and reclamation program, any product of the same type as the product marketed by the enterprise and that is deposited at one of its drop-off centres or for which the enterprise offers, if applicable, a collection service.

If a product is marketed under more than one brand, name or distinguishing guise, the obligation falls on the enterprise responsible for the product’s design.

Despite the first and second paragraphs, that obligation falls on the enterprise that acts as the “first supplier” of that product in Quebec, whether or not the enterprise is the importer, in the following cases:

1. the enterprise referred to in the first or second paragraph has no domicile or establishment in Quebec;

2. the enterprise that markets the product acquires the product outside Quebec, regardless of whether the enterprise owning or using the brand, name or distinguishing guise has a domicile or establishment in Quebec; or

3. a product does not bear any brand, name or distinguishing guise.

 

Practically speaking, in general, the obligation falls on the brand owner or the “first supplier” of the products in Quebec. “First supplier” means an enterprise having a domicile or establishment in Quebec (i.e. a physical location) that acquires a covered product outside Quebec in order to market it in Quebec. The first supplier is the enterprise located in Quebec that is the most upstream in the distribution chain in the province. Thus, a first supplier can be an importer, broker, wholesaler, distributor, retailer or any other stakeholder in Quebec that first intervenes in a product’s distribution chain.

OBLIGATIONS OF MEMBERS

Obligated enterprises that decide not to operate an individual program to recover and reclaim the products referred to in the Regulation must become members of an approved program. For household batteries, the approved program is that of Call2Recycle Canada, Inc.

To become members, enterprises must agree to do the following:

  • By the 30th day following every calendar quarter, send to Call2Recycle Canada, Inc.:
    • an accurate report of total products marketed in Quebec during the calendar quarter using the reporting form provided by Call2Recycle Canada, Inc.;
    • a check equal to the fees (plus applicable taxes) owed Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. based on the fee schedule in place, amended from time to time, as provided by Call2Recycle Canada, Inc.;
  • Keep proper books and records in respect of all products marketed in Quebec in accordance with good business practices and generally approved accounting procedures, and ensure these records shall be available at all reasonable times for examination or audit by Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. in accordance with Canadian Auditing Standards. This obligation remains even if a contributor by proxy reports the quantities of products marketed in Quebec and pays the fees on behalf.of the obligated enterprises;
  • Bear their fair share of the two reserve funds set up by Call2Recycle Canada, Inc. on behalf of its members to comply with regulatory obligations.

CONTRIBUTORS BY PROXY

Contributors by proxy, also called “voluntary contributors”, are enterprises that, while not covered by the Regulation, make the declarations and contributions in the name of covered enterprises.

Even in cases where contributors by proxy are used, the obligated enterprises must be members in good standing of Call2Recycle Canada, Inc.

KEY DATES

In the case of batteries marketed in Quebec separately (“Phase 1”), the obligation to implement a recovery and reclamation program started July 14th, 2012 or on the date of marketing, acquisition or manufacture of such products if it is subsequent to that date;

In the case of batteries marketed in Quebec as components of other products (“Phase 2”), the obligation started July 14th, 2013 or the date of marketing, acquisition or manufacture of such products if it is subsequent to that date.

The start date for the reporting of the quantities marketed and the remittance of ecofees will be August 1, 2015. The first report and ecofee remittance are due by October 30, 2015.

Note: The quantities marketed since January 1, 2015 will have to be reported, but ecofees will be due only on quantities marketed starting August 1, 2015, not on quantities marketed before this date.

Members FR (7)

RÈGLEMENT APPLICABLE

Le Règlement sur la récupération et la valorisation de produits par les entreprises du Québec assujettit les entreprises qui mettent sur le marché au Québec des piles et des batteries domestiques à l’obligation de mettre en œuvre un programme individuel ou de devenir membre d’un programme reconnu pour récupérer et valoriser les piles et les batteries en fin de cycle de vie.

Pour accéder au Règlement, vous pouvez cliquer ici.

TYPES DE PILES ET DE BATTERIES COUVERTS

Le Règlement indique que la catégorie des piles et des batteries domestiques est composée de deux sous-catégories :

1. les piles rechargeables de toute forme et les batteries constituées de telles piles, à l’exception des piles plomb-acide, des piles conçues pour être utilisées dans un véhicule automobile et des piles conçues et destinées exclusivement à des fins industrielles;

2. les piles boutons à usage unique, les batteries constituées de telles piles, les autres piles à usage unique et les batteries constituées de telles piles.

LES PILES ET LES BATTERIES COMME COMPOSANTS

En plus des piles et des batteries vendues séparément, les piles et les batteries mises sur le marché au Québec comme composants d’autres produits sont aussi visées par le Règlement.

D’ici à la révision du Règlement prévue en 2016, Appel à Recycler Canada, Inc. ne demande à ses membres que de déclarer les piles et batteries qui sont des composants d’outils de construction et de rénovation, et d’appareils d’entretien extérieur.

Pour la liste des outils de construction et de rénovation, ainsi que la liste des appareils d’entretien extérieur, vous pouvez cliquer ici.

ENTREPRISES VISÉES PAR LE RÈGLEMENT

Toute entreprise qui met sur le marché un produit neuf, visé par le Règlement, sous une marque de commerce, un nom ou un signe distinctif dont elle est la propriétaire ou, le cas échéant, l’utilisatrice est tenue de récupérer et valoriser ou de faire récupérer et valoriser, au moyen d’un programme de récupération et de valorisation, tout produit de même type que celui qu’elle met sur le marché et qui est déposé à l’un de ses points de dépôt ou pour lequel elle offre, le cas échéant, un service de collecte.

Si un produit est mis sur le marché sous plus d’une marque de commerce, nom ou signe distinctif, l’obligation prévue au premier alinéa incombe à l’entreprise responsable de la conception du produit.

Malgré les premier et deuxième alinéas, cette obligation incombe à l’entreprise qui agit à titre de premier fournisseur de ce produit au Québec, qu’elle en soit ou non l’importatrice, dans les cas suivants :

1° l’entreprise visée au premier ou deuxième alinéa n’a ni domicile, ni établissement au Québec;

2° l’entreprise qui met le produit sur le marché l’acquiert de l’extérieur du Québec, et ce, peu importe que l’entreprise propriétaire ou utilisatrice de la marque de commerce, du nom ou du signe distinctif ait son domicile ou un établissement au Québec;

3° un produit ne porte pas de marque de commerce, de nom ou de signe distinctif.

D’un point de vue pratique, l’obligation incombe en général aux propriétaires de marque(s) ou aux « premiers fournisseurs » qui introduisent le produit visé dans la province de Québec. Le    « premier fournisseur » désigne une entreprise ayant un domicile ou un établissement au Québec (c.-à-d. une adresse physique) qui acquiert un produit visé à l’extérieur du Québec dans le but de le commercialiser au Québec. Le premier fournisseur est l’entreprise située au Québec qui est le plus en amont dans la chaîne de distribution au Québec. Ainsi, le premier fournisseur peut être un importateur, un manufacturier, un courtier, un grossiste, un distributeur, un détaillant ou toute autre partie prenante au Québec qui intervient en premier dans la chaîne de distribution du produit visé au Québec.

OBLIGATIONS DES MEMBRES

Les entreprises assujetties qui décident de ne pas mettre en œuvre un programme individuel pour récupérer et valoriser les produits couverts par le Règlement doivent devenir membres d’un programme reconnu. Dans le cas des piles et des batteries domestiques, le programme reconnu est celui d’Appel à Recycler canada, Inc.

Pour devenir membres, les entreprises doivent convenir de ce qui suit :

  • Au plus tard 30 jours suivant chaque trimestre, envoyer à Appel à Recycler Canada, Inc.:
    • un rapport exact des quantités totales de produits mis sur le marché au Québec durant le trimestre en utilisant les formulaires de rapport fournis par Appel à Recycler Canada, Inc.;
    • un chèque égal au montant des frais (plus taxes applicables) dus à Appel à Recycler Canada, Inc. selon le barème de frais en vigueur, amendé de temps à autre, tel que fourni par Appel à Recycler Canada, Inc.;
  • Tenir des livres et registres à l’égard de tous les produits mis sur le marché au Québec conformément aux bonnes pratiques de gestion et aux principes comptables généralement reconnus, et s’assurer que ces registres soient disponibles en tout temps raisonnable pour un examen ou un audit par Appel à Recycler Canada, Inc. en accord avec les Normes canadiennes d’audit. Cette obligation demeure même si un contributeur mandataire rapporte les produits mis sur le marché au Québec et paie les frais au nom des entreprises assujetties;
  • Assumer leur juste part des fonds de réserve établis par Appel à Recycler Canada, Inc. au nom de ses Membres aux fins de conformité avec les obligations réglementaires.

CONTRIBUTEURS MANDATAIRES

Les contributeurs mandataires, aussi appelés « contributeurs volontaires », sont des entreprises qui, sans être assujetties au Règlement, effectuent les déclarations et les contributions au nom d’entreprise assujetties.

Même dans le cas où des contributeurs mandataires sont utilisés, les entreprises assujetties doivent être des membres en règle d’Appel à Recycler Canada, Inc.

DATES CLÉS

Dans le cas des piles et des batteries mises sur le marché séparément au Québec (« Phase 1 »), l’obligation de mettre en œuvre un programme de récupération et de valorisation a commencé le 14 juillet 2012 ou à la date de la mise sur le marché, de l’acquisition ou de la fabrication d’un tel produit si elle est postérieure à cette date;

Dans le cas des piles et des batteries mises sur le marché au Québec comme composants d’autres produits (« Phase 2 »), l’obligation a commencé le 14 juillet 2013 ou à la date de la mise sur le marché, de l’acquisition ou de la fabrication d’un tel produit si elle est postérieure à cette date.

Le nouveau système de déclaration des quantités mises en marché et de paiement des écofrais va commencer le 1er août 2015. Le premier rapport et les premiers écofrais devront être reçus avant le 30 octobre 2015.

Note : Les quantités mises en marché depuis le 1er janvier 2015 devront être déclarées, mais les écofrais ne seront dus que sur les quantités mises en marché à compter du 1er août 2015, pas sur les quantités mises sur le marché à compter du 1er janvier 2015.

Obligation (2)

I’m already a member in Quebec, how do I declare my obligation for Manitoba and/or British Columbia?

As an existing member, please log into GreenTrax to declare your obligation for other provinces.

How can I find out if I am obligated?

To help determine whether your entity is the obligated party, please review the provincial regulations:

Quebec Regulatory EN (7)

Case 1. The manufacturer ships and invoices from Ontario, and it does not have representatives in Quebec. Are we covered by the Regulation?

Yes. Since the manufacturer does not have representatives in Quebec to take your orders, you are deemed the first supplier in Quebec, hence the obligation falls on you.

Case 2. The manufacturer ships and invoices from Ontario, but we give our orders to its representatives in Quebec. Are we covered by the Regulation?

No. Since the manufacturer has representatives in Quebec to take your orders, it is deemed the first supplier in Quebec, even if it ships and invoices from outside of Quebec.

Case 3. We are part of a chain of stores. We don’t deal directly with the manufacturer, instead we receive the products from our national distribution centre (DC) in Ontario. Are we covered by the Regulation?

Your national DC in Ontario plays the same role as the manufacturer in Cases 1 and 2 above. If the chain has personnel in Quebec to take your orders, then the chain is the first supplier in Quebec, but if it does not have personnel in Quebec to take your orders, then you are deemed the first supplier in Quebec and the obligation falls on you.

Case 4. We place our orders in Ontario, but the manufacturer ships and invoices us from within Quebec. Does this make any difference?

No, it does not. Wherever the manufacturer ships and invoices from, what matter is whether the manufacturer’s representatives that you deal with for your orders are located in Quebec or outside of Quebec.

Case 5. The manufacturer is based outside of Quebec and we give our orders to its representatives in Quebec, but we own the brand. Does this make any difference?

Yes, it does. Even though you place your orders to the manufacturer’s representatives in Quebec, since you own the brand, the obligation falls on you.

Case 6. We are covered by the Regulation, so we must declare the quantities that we market in Quebec, but are they what we purchase or what we sell?

For the purpose of the Regulation, any product that enters the province is considered as “marketed” in Quebec. Hence you must report the quantities that you purchase, not the quantities that you sell.

Case 7. Our national distribution centre (DC) is located in Quebec. Parts of the products received by our DC from outside of Quebec are forwarded to stores outside of the province. What quantities of the products received by our DC have to be reported?

For the purpose of the Regulation, the quantities forwarded by your DC to your stores outside of Quebec may be deducted from the total quantities received by your DC from outside of Quebec, but the process must be properly documented for audit purposes.

Quebec Regulatory FR (7)

Cas 1. Le manufacturier expédie et facture de l’Ontario, et il n’a pas de représentants au Québec. Sommes-nous assujettis au Règlement ?

Oui. Puisque le manufacturer n’a pas de représentants au Québec pour prendre vos commandes, vous êtes réputés être le premier fournisseur au Québec, donc l’obligation vous incombe.

Cas 2. Le manufacturier expédie et facture de l’Ontario, mais nous donnons nos commandes à ses représentants au Québec. Sommes-nous assujettis au Règlement ?

Non. Puisque le manufacturier a des représentants au Québec pour prendre vos commandes, il est réputé être le premier fournisseur au Québec, donc l’obligation lui incombe.

Cas 3. Nous faisons partie d’une chaîne de magasins. Nous ne transigeons pas directement avec le manufacturier, nous recevons les produits de notre centre de distribution national en Ontario. Sommes-nous assujettis au Règlement ?

Votre centre de distribution national en Ontario joue le même rôle que le manufacturier dans les cas 1 and 2 ci-dessus. Si la chaîne a du personnel au Québec pour prendre vos commandes, alors la chaîne est le premier fournisseur au Québec, mais si elle n’a pas de personnel au Québec pour prendre vos commandes, alors vous êtes réputés être le premier fournisseur au Québec et l’obligation vous incombe.

Cas 4. Nous plaçons nos commandes en Ontario, mais le manufacturier expédie et facture depuis le Québec. Cela fait-il une différence ?

Non, cela n’en fait pas. Peu importe d’où le manufacturier expédie et facture, ce qui compte c’est de savoir si les représentants du manufacturier avec qui vous transigez pour vos commandes sont situés au Québec ou en dehors du Québec.

Cas 5. Le manufacturier est basé en dehors du Québec et nous donnons nos commandes à ses représentants au Québec, mais nous possédons la marque. Cela fait-il une différence ?

Oui, cela en fait une. Même si vous placez vos commandes aux représentants du manufacturier au Québec, puisque vous possédez la marque, l’obligation vous incombe.

Cas 6. Nous sommes assujettis au Règlement, donc nous devons déclarer les quantités que nous mettons sur le marché au Québec, mais s’agit-il de celles que nous achetons ou de celles que nous vendons?

Aux fins du Règlement, est considéré comme « mis sur le marché » au Québec tout produit qui entre dans la province afin d’y être commercialisé. Vous devez donc rapporter vos achats de produits et non pas vos ventes.

Cas 7. Notre centre de distribution national est situé au Québec. Une partie des produits reçus à notre centre de distribution de l’extérieur du Québec est réacheminée vers des magasins en dehors de la province. Quelles quantités des produits reçus par notre centre de distribution doivent-elles être rapportées ?

Aux fins du Règlement, les quantités réacheminées de votre centre de distribution vers vos magasins en dehors du Québec peuvent être déduites des quantités totales reçues par votre centre de distribution de l’extérieur du Québec, mais le processus doit être clairement documenté pour les fins d’audit.

Recycling Program (11)

Do you offer an all-battery recycling program?

Yes, we collect and recycle both single-use and rechargeable batteries (weighing up to 5 kg each) in all Canadian provinces. To find the nearest participating site, visit thelocation finder, contact our Customer Service Team or call 888.224.9764.

 

How do I recycle?

The program is simple. Just collect your used batteries (weighing up to 5 kg each) and cellphones). Find the nearest Call2Recycle collection site, either by visiting our location finder or calling Customer Service Team at 888.224.9764, and drop the items off at no charge. The collection site will ship the batteries and cellphones to our recycling partners, where they are sorted for recycling. Depending on their condition, cellphones may be refurbished and resold with proceeds used to help fund the cellphone collection program and public education efforts. For a step-by-step guide on how to recycle, click here.

What do you accept?

We currently collect and recycle all single-use and rechargeable batteries weighing less than 5 kg each and cellphones in all Canadian provinces. Visit the What Can I Recycle page for specific details. Visit the Canadian Battery Association’s RecycleMyBattery website to find out where you can recycle the batteries we don’t currently accept. 

 

Is it free to recycle or is there a charge?

We are the only no-cost battery and cellphone product stewardship program offered across North America. There is no charge to recycle.

Do I have to collect from the public to participate as a collection site?

You don’t need to collect from the public to become a Call2Recycle collection site. Many organizations choose to collect only from internal locations and not from the public. Either option is available. You can contact our Customer Service Teamor call 888.224.9764 for details.

Where can I recycle?

Our drop-off locator can help you quickly find the nearest location in Canada. These locations include major retailers, community centres, and public agencies. We also have private collection sites at hospitals, military bases, businesses and government agencies. Check with your facilities manager to see if your employer is a private collection site.

Who pays for the recycling program?

Major product and battery manufacturers across the globe, called industry stewards, fund our recycling program to ensure that the batteries and cellphones that they introduce into the marketplace are being responsibly recycled when they reach their end of life. These industry stewards are committed to keeping batteries and cellphones out of the solid waste stream and recycling them to create new products. You can support participating manufacturers by looking for products featuring the Call2Recycle Battery Seal.

Why should I recycle my batteries?

The number of wireless products powered by batteries is skyrocketing. It is increasingly important that people recognize that batteries and cellphones may contain metals that can be harmful to the environment if not disposed of properly. Our goal is to divert these potentially harmful materials from the solid waste stream and recycle their by-products into new products.

What do you do with the batteries and cellphones I drop off?

All our collected batteries are sent to sorters and processors in the U.S. and Canada. These companies sort the batteries by chemistry, and then melt them down into by-products that are used to make new products such as batteries, stainless steel alloy and cement additives. Cellphones are refurbished and resold when possible, or recycled, with the proceeds being used to fund the program. You can see how we recycle batteries in this video.

Is the Call2Recycle Program offered in other countries?

The Call2Recycle program is also offered in the U.S.

Registration & Reporting (7)

When should I register?

As soon as possible. BC/MB EHF implementation and the QC rate adjustment are effective on February 1, 2017.

How do I report?

Upon registration as a Call2Recycle Canada Member, you will gain access to Call2Recycle’s reporting portal, GreenTrax,

How often do I need to report?

Reporting occurs monthly.

How should I register?

To and register as a member of Call2Recycle Canada, Inc., please visit our GreenTrax reporting portal.

What if I want to report and remit sales on behalf of the obligated steward?

You may choose to enter into a Contributor by Proxy Agreement.

This proxy agreement, which is a voluntary agreement between two parties, will provide satisfactory evidence for Call2Recycle in the case that one party agrees to report data and remit sales on behalf of an obligated party.